More Autumn Whitetail

November 17, 2015  •  6 Comments

It's mid-November and the White-tailed Deer rut has been underway.  I found many of the bucks in this photo blog following their doe through the woods but some have been walking alone.  So far, I've seen two fights and wasn't able to photograph either one.  The first one happened soon after the buck and his three doe walked up and over a hilltop. I could hear it and by the time I was in position where I could see both bodies, they broke apart and the loser ran off.  The second fight wasn't really a dominance fight.  It seems like they were playing more than fighting.  However, it was getting very dark and I was heading back to my vehicle when I stumbled upon them.  So, I just stood and watched.

I have been lucky in my quest to photograph these majestic animals.  I hope you enjoy.

Here is a 10-point with a nice, symmetrical rack.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

I found this little doe out in the open eating acorns.  She stared at me for a few minutes then started stomping her foot.  I moved on so I didn't bother her feeding time any more than I already did.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

I had images of this buck in my last whitetail rut photo blog.  Here is another pose that I want to share.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This wide 6-point was hot on the trail of a doe.  I'm glad he stopped to take a look at me.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

The next photo was a super long shot down into a valley.  He didn't see me so I had to make a few noises so he would stop.  Luckily, he stopped before going behind the tree because the woods became really thick on the other side.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

They can't all have big racks.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

Acorns have fallen from the mighty oaks so there is plenty of food in the woods right now.  Here is a doe that was busy scraping through the oak leaves looking for acorns.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This 3-point was standing next to an apple orchard.  I was driving by just as he was beginning to walk into the woods.  Luckily, I was able to take a few photos before he disappeared.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

Forests with heavy canopies are ideal for whitetail photography because undergrowth doesn't grow as thick.  That situation is bad for the whitetail because they lack the browse to eat during the harsh winters.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This guy has had some damage done to his antler.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

I never get tired of seeing these guys in the woods.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This is the winner of one of the fights I mentioned at the beginning of this blog.  He is still breathing heavily minutes after the other buck ran away.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This doe looks small as she walks through the tall weeds at the edge of a meadow.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This buck was at least 75 yards from me as it neared darkness.  The Canon 5D MK III does a really nice job of lightening the scene but the iso was set very high and the shutter speed was at 1/25 of a second and I didn't have a tripod.  A tree makes a wonderful support under these circumstances.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This 8-point is probably the widest I've seen so far this year.  The next three photos are of the same deer.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

It looks like there could be a ninth point on his left rack but I don't know if it would count.  I believe they need to be one inch long to be counted.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

Seemingly unaware of my presence, he watches his does as they lie among the fallen logs on the hillside.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

After a little while, he began to descend the hillside, weaving around the fallen trees, to be with his small herd.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

This tall 4-point was walking through the woods but not straying far from a spike and three does.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

He found some fresh greens through the fallen leaves.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

Not large enough to be a threat, this spike was allowed to hang out with three does and the 4-point in the previous two photos.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

I'll end this blog with another look at a majestic 10-point that I found walking through the forest populated with wild cherry trees.

White-tailed DeerWhite-tailed Deer

 

I hope you enjoyed the images in this second White-tailed Deer photo blog this fall.  I'm sure you'll see more whitetail photos dotted throughout my blogs but possibly not as many.  Check back soon, or watch on Facebook, for my next blog about my recent trip to photograph Bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam in the lower Susquehanna River near Darlington, MD.

Thanks for looking,

Dan


Comments

Ruby(non-registered)
Really Beautiful Images !! Waiting for Your Next :)
Willard Hill(non-registered)
Excellent photos, Dan. You are correct about the 1" requirement for it to be counted a point--at least by Boone and Crockett standards. Good to see you are getting a lot of good whitetail photos.
Jim Weixel(non-registered)
Nice photos, difficult to get. Beautiful animals!
Janie Conrad(non-registered)
Beautiful pictures! Thank you for sharing your talent with us. I love seeing these wildlife pictures and your comments.
Steve Ferendo(non-registered)
Nice photos. Glad to see they are cooperating for you.
No comments posted.
Loading...